BLOG

I Read... There... I Said It!

03 July 2009 by Stuart Cam

I am sometimes asked "so how do you keep up-to-date with all that's happening in the industry?".

Well, I...

The problem is making time for these endeavours. Usually I will alternate between them, much like a buffet, occasionally gorging on a particular topic when I am in the right frame of mind. Obsessive? possibly... but I think it's important to have a varied diet to keep it exciting.

Online articles and coding websites are great for picking up the odd skill or two but they often lack the depth required for some topics.

I had attempted to reconcile my love of technical books and mitigate some of their downsides (size, weight, cost and errata) by purchasing a Sony PRS-500 and seeking out digital versions of titles. I bought the unit when it first launched a couple of years ago and since then it has seen relatively little action. It's been quite a disappointment. The main problem is screen size, or lack thereof. It's way too small to render diagrams and code snippets with clarity. If your primary goal is to read technical books then I'd suggest avoiding the unit altogether and consider a tablet PC instead. That, or take a look at the much larger 9.7" Kindle DX.

I have recently purchased a round of new books in dead-tree format, which I intend to read over the coming weeks...

Software Development

97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know - Various

97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know - Various

I originally found out about the book through Udi Dahan's blog. Udi has made a couple of article contributions and figured it would be worth a read since I respect his opinions on software development and admire his NServiceBus framework.

The book contains small snippets of non-technical advice from a variety of architects - experience which, in some cases, has been hard won.

The unedited contributions from each author are available for free.


SOA in Practice: The Art of Distributed System Design - Nicolai M. Josuttis

SOA in Practice: The Art of Distributed System Design - Nicolai M. Josuttis

What are the two rules of distributed computing?

1. Do not distribute, it's difficult
2. See #1 (asynchronously)

I know, I know, it's a terrible joke! I had been looking around for an authoritative book on SOA and distributed systems and this book came highly recommended for cutting through the hype. The accompanying website can be found here.


.NET Framework

Effective C#: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your C# - Bill Wagner

Effective C#: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your C# - Bill Wagner

I had originally found out about this book through my professional network on LinkedIn via Chris Fulstow. He had mentioned that he was reading the book so I figured it must be worth a look.

It's full of best practices specifically for C#, covering some of the more esoteric language 'features' and how to avoid digging yourself into a big hole with them.

Take a listen to the interview with Bill Wagner on .NET Rocks!


More Effective C#: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your C# - Bill Wagner

More Effective C#: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your C# - Bill Wagner

I figured I ought to buy the sequel as it contains information on how to get the best out of the newest C# features such as LINQ and Lambda Expressions.

I heard about this book through Chris Fulstow (again) and subsequently through another .NET Rocks! podcast with Bill Wagner.


ASP.NET MVC 1.0 Quickly - Maarten Balliauw

ASP.NET MVC 1.0 Quickly - Maarten Balliauw

I've been aware of the ASP.NET MVC framework for quite some time. Pretty much the day after Scott Guthrie announced a prototype at the ALT.NET conference. I was looking for a short book which would assume knowledge of ASP.NET and cut straight to the .NET MVC implementation.

Since v1.0 is fairly new there are numerous online tutorials for earlier versions and some great MVC blogs, but not much in the way of printed books. This looked to be the best of a small bunch.


Windows Presentation Foundation Unleashed - Adam Nathan

Windows Presentation Foundation Unleashed - Adam Nathan

I have a minor confession. I have zero WPF experience, which is a little embarrassing since it replaced GDI+ long, long ago.

Unlike many other technical books this one is printed on glossy paper in full colour and totally jam packed with pictures and diagrams. Perfect presentation for learning a presentation framework!

An ex-colleague, Jack Ukleja, recommended this book.


Other Technologies

The Definitive ANTLR Reference - Terrence Parr

The Definitive ANTLR Reference - Terrence Parr

I purchased a digital copy of this book some time ago and have nearly finished reading it... in the bath... on my PRS-500... wrapped rather optimistically in cling film. This time I figured I'd buy the paper version and risk the £16.88 it would cost me to replace if I dropped it!

Bath + electrical items != mix.


Compilers: Principles, Techniques and Tools - Various

Compilers: Principles, Techniques and Tools - Various

Probably the densest, in both physical and subject matter, of all the books I purchased. I had a quick flick through some of the material and it looks pretty heavy going and full of maths. I anticipate that this will take a long time to read and no doubt expose many other holes in my knowledge along the journey.

My primary motivation was to supplement the ANTLR book with other compiler topics.


Collective Intelligence in Action - Satnam Alag

Collective Intelligence in Action - Satnam Alag

A rather interesting book intended for a Java audience, but which contains mathematics and algorithms suitable for implementation elsewhere. I discovered the book whilst surfing the internet for recommendation engines, which itself was a spur from reading about a recommendation engine that Joel Pobar had written in F#.

Hopefully this book will shed some insight on writing a sophisticated Web 2.0 application.


NHibernate in Action - Various

NHibernate in Action - Various

Another re-purchase of a book I own in digital form. I have followed it through the Manning Early Access Program.

My main gripe is that it doesn't cover the newest version of NHibernate, but given the time it takes to write a book and the speed at which frameworks evolve it's forgivable.

One of the best references for NHibernate available today.


Other

Here Comes Everybody - Clay Shirky

Here Comes Everybody - Clay Shirky

If I had a dollar for every time I heard Jeff Atwood mention Clay Shirky on the StackOverflow podcast I'd probably be able to buy this book without opening my wallet! Instead, I decided to spend my own money and discover the material for myself.

It comes highly rated and promises some insight on the huge changes we are seeing on the internet today with social networking and the wisdom (or madness) of crowds.


The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less - Barry Schwartz

The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less - Barry Schwartz

This is the least technical book of the bunch, cited as a reference in The Cult of the Amateur - a book I really enjoyed reading on my travels.

I would probably consider myself a 'maximiser' when it comes to making purchases - perhaps this book will change the way I rationalise my spending decisions? Perhaps it will change the way I buy books? :)


Simply put, read books and treat your education as a #1 priority.

Bill Hicks would probably agree (just with more swearing):

Tags: , , ,

Categories: .NET | Books | C Sharp | General | MVC | SOA | Web


© Codebrain 2014. All Rights Reserved. Registered in England: 07744920. VAT: GB 119 4078 13